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Quick update – February/March plans

Quick update – February/March plans

Sorry Guys!

It has been a quiet February so far. While I had some ideas on what to post, I was struggling whether to work on them. I prefer higher quality posts to just posting for the sake of posting.

No worries. I have a few items planned for the next few weeks.

I will be heading over to Kaohsiung, Taiwan again later this week for work. Fortunately, I will have some free time there to attempt to do up a few quality posts for you guys. Expect to see places to go to and places to eat at. Surprisingly, the Taiwanese like to give their restaurants names like “Chicken Big Brother” or “Cow Second Brother”. I will hopefully be able to cover one or two of those restaurants this time around. Until then, do check out my earlier posts on Kaohsiung here.

I will also be doing short updates leading up to my trip to the Golden Triangle in India (i.e. Delhi, Agra and Jaipur). I hope the mini guides will be helpful for all those heading to India (e.g. How to apply for visas online before visiting India and booking the dreaded railway tickets). God willing, I won’t have to shift my travel dates due to work obligations.

Meanwhile, have a look at this hidden gem in Singapore (Photos were taken at CHIJMES). It looks really pretty with all those lights. Very dreamy… Perfect place for a drink or two with your SO. For my foreign readers, CHIJMES was previously a convent/school that was converted to an entertainment facility showcasing various restaurants and pubs! Cheap booze anyone? (Tip: If you want happy hour prices, stay away from the main square and head deep into the interior corridors for better prices!)

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Travel Hack: A better way to find cheaper (cheapest) flights

Different travellers have their own “travel hack” on how to get the cheapest travel deal.

For some, it means booking on a Tuesday (Don’t ask me why but there appears to be some rumour that that the cheapest deals are on Tuesdays). For others, it might mean arranging your holidays such that your flights are scheduled on less popular weekday slots or odd hour slots. Then you have package deals on Expedia where bundling gets you a better value than you would have had booking separately. Why not also include the price guarantees offered on travel sites?    

Is there a simpler way? Something like a “An Idiot’s Guide to Travel Hacking”?

Have a look at Matrix Airfare Search.

This search engine is amazing as it offers what appears to be an independent search of  available flights (Note: the engine appears unable to identify budget airlines). “Independent” here is reflected by the fact that the engine is not managed by a travel agency. The operator neither sells any tickets nor earns any commission from your purchases. The site will show the relevant airlines and you can either book your tickets directly with the airline online or through an agent. If booking via an agent, Matrix will provide you the relevant booking codes.

Use the site as either a confirmation of your other price research or as a preliminary search to get a sense of the price for a particular leg.

Make sure to search both “Cheapest Available” and “Business Class or higher” options when using the search feature. Sometimes you may find good bargains where flying business will cost you just a few hundred dollars more. For example, for my upcoming trip to Delhi from Singapore. A direct return flight via Jet Airways would have cost me S$400. Flying business class via Malaysia Airlines with a stop in KL would just require a top up of another S$400. Definitely worth the bit more for a better flight experience.

There are also better examples like this where the options on Expedia although cheaper is just slightly cheaper than if you had flown business:

Expedia: Singapore to Kaohsiung, Taiwan (Assuming you are unable or unwilling to fly Scoot):

Vietnam Airlines Economy S$830.50

11 February 2018 (SG – KHH)

1.25pm – 9.55pm

13 February 2018 (KHH- SG)

7.30am – 7.25pm

 

Cathay Pacific Economy S$1,387.60

11 February 2018 (SG – KHH)

6.50am – 2.10pm

13 February 2018 (KHH-SG)

9.25pm – 11.55am

 

Matrix: Singapore to Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Vietnam Airlines Mixed S$1,125

11 February 2018 (SG – KHH) (Economy)

1.25pm – 9.55pm

13 February 2018 (KHH- SG) (Business, Part)

7.30am – 7.25pm

 

Vietnam Airlines Mixed S$1,624

11 February 2018 (SG – KHH) (Business, Part)

1.25pm – 9.55pm

13 February 2018 (KHH- SG) (Business)

7.30am – 7.25pm

This opens up a lot of options for you.

For example, instead of flying economy on Cathay and paying S$1,387, you have the option of flying the cheaper Vietnam flight at S$1,125 to experience Business Class for one part of your journey or topping up slightly for the S$1,624 flight for a more complete Business Class experience.

While using Matrix doesn’t guarantee that you will find cheaper tickets, it opens up more options to choose from. I hope you will find it useful and will incorporate it into your holiday planning.

Remember to like and follow for more travel hacks and tips!

My (not so) near death experience – Fugu dining

My (not so) near death experience – Fugu dining

I always dreamed of trying and experiencing something unique. Sort of like marking significant milestones in my life. One such milestone is cheating death by eating Fugu or what is commonly known as pufferfish or blowfish.

Fugu? What is Fugu (Pufferfish aka Blowfish)?

For those wondering what Fugu is, National Geographic nicely describes this deadly fish as:

ABOUT PUFFERFISH

Biologists think pufferfish, also known as blowfish, developed their famous “inflatability” because their slow, somewhat clumsy swimming style makes them vulnerable to predators. In lieu of escape, pufferfish use their highly elastic stomachs and the ability to quickly ingest huge amounts of water (and even air when necessary) to turn themselves into a virtually inedible ball several times their normal size. Some species also have spines on their skin to make them even less palatable.

Toxicity

A predator that manages to snag a puffer before it inflates won’t feel lucky for long. Almost all pufferfish contain tetrodotoxin, a substance that makes them foul tasting and often lethal to fish. To humans, tetrodotoxin is deadly, up to 1,200 times more poisonous than cyanide. There is enough toxin in one pufferfish to kill 30 adult humans, and there is no known antidote.

I was about to put something 1200 times deadlier than cyanide on my plate and hope to almighty God that I don’t die from it.

Well sort of.

Pufferfish, if prepared correctly is not toxic. Only certain parts of the fish will cause death if ingested. The emphasis here is “if prepared correctly”.

If done wrongly, I would be 6 feet under.

Evidently, I didn’t die. If not, you will be the first person reading a blog entry from the other world.

How does Pufferfish Taste Like?

I had it in Tokyo, Japan after my whirlwind tour of Hokkaido with my girlfriend where we visited Hakodate, Noboribetsu, Sapporo and Otaru. It was our last meal in Tokyo and we wanted to try something unique.

We went for Fugu at Torafugu-tei near the famous Shibuya Crossing. You can’t miss it since it has a huge ass Fugu right above the store front!

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This restaurant serves a variety of Fugu called “Tiger Blowfish”.

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Great to know that the restaurant serves “Only the safest product”

There’s a la carte and also meal courses on offer. When we were there, there were two courses on offer. One going for 4,980 yen before taxes. The other going for 6,480 yen before taxes. While we were a little puzzled by the menu, there appears to be only minor differences with the menu (the more expensive comes with “Deep Fried Blowfish” while the cheaper menu instead comes with “Blowfish under-skin”), we decided to go big (if it’s going to be our last meal after all) and ordered the 6,480 yen set.

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First up, came the Blowfish Skin. If you had jellyfish before, it has a similar chewy texture. It was very refreshing due to the sauce it was served in. It was citrusy like a mix of soy sauce and some kind citrus fruit. The grated ginger (that reddish thing) was not overpowering and helped balance out any fishiness (although I didn’t feel that the dish was at all fishy in taste). I would have loved it even more if it had been a hot summer day as the dish was served chilled.

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Blowfish Sashimi was up next. Surprisingly, unlike our typical experience with Japanese Sashimi, it was not served with wasabi. Instead, again you find a small portion of ginger on the side to go with your soy sauce. There was also a slice of lime, if required. This was, I think, the key point in the meal as you get to experience the actual taste of fugu. Its surprisingly neutral tasting and very “clean” tasting. It doesn’t have a taste per se unlike Salmon and/or Tuna. Or it’s just me not having grown up with fugu and not recognising a “fugu” taste. The flesh is very firm and slightly chewy. Likely from all that muscle gained from puffing away? I actually felt something while having the sashimi. My lips felt slightly numb. Was it just my brain working overtime or was it really true that a master fugu chef will just leave a slight amount of toxin on the flesh to tease diners?

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Blowfish hotpot. Yep, we graduated from the raw food portion of the meal. So, what happened was the restaurant staff had laid out a sort of paper bowl in the middle of the table that is above an induction heater. The bowl had a metal piece in it that heats up the broth. The broth was very simple (essentially a piece of seaweed to give some flavour). I guess the idea was to not overwhelm the delicate taste of the blowfish. Any heavier and/or stronger tasting broth would have covered the little taste of the fugu. We were told to cook between 6-7 minutes per piece (longer for bigger pieces and shorter for smaller pieces). The flesh, when boiled, was tender. There was no fishy smell at all. For those who are used to having fish soup of some kind, you will normally assume to soup to have some kind of fishy taste/smell to it. Oddly, there was none. It really goes towards showing how neutral tasting the fish actually is. I did try drinking of the broth towards the end. It was a pleasant tasting soup with a slight sweetness from all those vegetables that came with the hotpot. But not much taste attributable to the fugu itself. HINT: Don’t drink too much of the broth. One or two spoonsful is/are good enough as the broth has one more task to perform.

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Midway into our hotpot came the fried blowfish. Make a guess what did it taste like. Like fried chicken, of course. Honestly, I believe you can actually pass off fried fugu as a nice piece of fried chicken. The entire thing was crispy and tender. Absolutely delightful.

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Blowfish Porridge. Well, there is no blowfish involved here. Instead, the staff will prepare the porridge at your table using the broth leftover from the hotpot. They will add in a bowl of rice to soak in all that goodness before pouring in an egg for flavour before topping it off with some spring onions and some soy sauce. It was more than plenty for the two of us. We found that the waitress was a bit light on the soy sauce and we decided to add it a bit more. The porridge evolves with time. At first, its watery before turning thick after absorbing in all that broth. I found it to be very filling and my advice is that if you think you are already about full, you might want to ask the waitress to cut back on the rice so that you won’t have too much porridge.

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We ended our meal with a small dessert – a mini ice cream sandwich.

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Post fugu meal – I didn’t die!!!

As time ticked by, I knew I was safe. I cheated death.

Would I recommend Fugu? Yes! Definitely. I do think most should at least try it once during their lifetime. But do remember to have it at proper establishments with proper fugu chefs. While deaths do occur, they can be attributed to amateurs who had no idea what they were actually doing.

Have you tried fugu? Let me know in the comments.

As usual, please remember to LIKE and if you haven’t done so already, please FOLLOW!

 

My Backpacking Experience on Business Class: Part II

My Backpacking Experience on Business Class: Part II

This is a continuation of my previous article where I shared my experience flying business class for the first time whilst backpacking. You can’t blame me for flying business if the tickets were so cheap (Approx SGD1100 return). For that poor chap who grumbled to his significant other as to when they could afford to fly business, it ain’t so difficult. Hehe. I guess my business class seats costs just slightly more or if not the same as their economy seats. The joys of travel hacking.

Checking in at Haneda Airport

It had been a fast paced holiday for the both of us. In a matter of 7 days, we covered Hakodate, Noboribetsu, Sapporo and a tiny weeny bit of Tokyo. And we were now at the tail end of our trip. But unlike other trips, this was still going to be an awesome experience. We were flying business back to Singapore!

Checking in was easy. Although I could sense some confusion among the JAL airline counter staff. They took some time to process my tickets. They claimed that there were errors or some problems on their system.

Haha. =D I think, they were just confused by the odd nature of my ticket. You see, we had just spent a week long layover in Tokyo and were trying to continue with our single flight from Bangkok to Singapore (Hint: That’s part of the hack).

After a few “Is there any problem with our tickets” and a few “We are sorry. We are checking your tickets’ validity”, we were issued our business class tickets. Yahoo!

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While it may seem a bit frightening especially since deep down you know the reason why their systems are raising mini-alarms, I didn’t really feel much panic/scare. Somehow, I had faith in JAL’s staff making things happen (actually I think for most decent airlines) when dealing with Business Class passengers. You can say its some form of privilege or them going an extra mile to make their customers happy.

Sakura Lounge at Haneda Airport

This lounge didn’t disappoint. If you remember my earlier post, I actually complained about the food on offer at the Bangkok lounge. Their Haneda Lounge is much better.

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First off, as I am a beer fan, I was completely blown away by their beer dispensing machines. Yes, machines with an “s”. One was for Asahi. The other was for Kirin. This ensures that each schooner is always a perfect schooner with that nice layer of foam crowning the glass. For those who don’t frequent such lounges, lounges typically either offer canned beers (Booo!!!) or beers on tap (eg. SQ’s lounges at Changi). While tapping your own beers seem fun, the overall glass of beer may not be perfect. So a plus one for the beer dispensers! There are also other beverages on offer if beer is not your thing.

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Second, the food spread was better. Like the Bangkok Lounge, the lounge had the usual fare like curry rice, miso soup, bread basket and salads. Unlike the Bangkok Lounge, this lounge also offered other stuff like dumplings, siew mai, udon, spaghetti, sushi, different types of soups. While I would have preferred a more western offering (the variety was still very Japanese oriented), the food was satisfactory.

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Third, the lounge actually has lockers available for guests. I believe this is a good feature to have especially for lone travellers who don’t want to be bogged down by their hand carry. They can just deposit it in one of those lockers and retrieve them when they leave the lounge.

Fourth, shower facilities are available as well. I always appreciate a shower just before boarding especially if I had been out the whole day before the flight. Hehe. I made sure to snap a few photos for your guys this time around. Very inviting right?

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Business Class : Haneda Airport to Changi Airport

Okay. If my Bangkok-Narita flight was awesome, this flight must be “awesomer”. Is that even a word?

The seats are more spacious or appear to be more spacious since the airline did away the mini-cabins that I described in my earlier post. Instead of constricted cabins, the seats are now more open concept based so you don’t feel wrapped in or forced into a small area.

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Everything feels right. The seat reclining buttons are now located on the arm rest within easy reach from your fingers. This was unlike my earlier experience where the buttons located in an awkward position.

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There is also a cabinet attached to each seat. In it was a thoughtfully placed bottle of water which was a nice gesture especially for those drinkers who may need to hydrate after those many glasses of champagne. While I did not drink champagne, that bottle of water came in handy after I downed a bottle of sake ><

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An interesting thing I found while on the flight was the toiletries displayed in the washrooms on board the plane. You have the usual toothbrush and mouthwash. You can also find eye masks displayed. Do not confuse this with the eye mask you wear to block out the light while you try to catch some sleep. This eye mask is similar to the face mask (the kind you put on your face to help moisturise/beautify your skin) but for your eye region. Something odd but definitely a plus point for me!

The menu for the flight:

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As usual, since this is a night flight, there’s a late night snack on offer. This time round some kind of pastry. It was a nice experience as I did not have to ask for the night snack. The crew had offered it when I ordered my drinks. Hehe, I could have forgotten about the snacks but for their reminder.

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Breakfast was either Japanese or Western. I went with Western after my bad experience with JAL’s Japanese breakfast on the flight in. I guess it was a good choice with the smoked duck and the omelette. You can’t go wrong with that kind of combination. The omelette was, however, slightly dry (i.e. overcooked). The best I had so far was on SQ’s business class. The omelette there was actually moist. JAL, please do something about it!!!

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Verdict

Would I fly JAL again? 100% yes. While I find the food can always be better, the price (if I can continue my travel hacking) is definitely affordable and a bargain especially when flying to Japan.

Please remember to like if you enjoyed reading this port. Follow if you don’t mind supporting this blog.

A heads-up: Do drop by again soon. I will be flying Malaysian Airlines’ Business Class in March from Singapore to Delhi (Found a real bargain for the tickets SGD810 return!). Expect Malaysian Hospitality and more awesome reviews for you all.

 

Backpacker on Business Class! WHAT?!

Backpacker on Business Class! WHAT?!

While I have flown business on a number of occasions as a young associate accompanying my bosses for meetings overseas, I have not flown business for leisure my last 28 years on this planet. That was until now. Whilst backpacking to boot. This is my experience flying on Japan Airlines Business Class from Bangkok to Narita, Tokyo for cheap (Approx SGD1100 return ><). 

Checking in @  Suvarnabhumi Airport

We arrived early after having done a whole day’s worth of shopping at Chatuchak Market and Platinum Mall. And I was sure glad that we were on Business Class. Shorter queues while checking in and also a chance to grab a well needed shower at the Sakura lounge after lugging my backpack with me all around Bangkok. For the uninitiated, Business Class passengers are entitled to use the airline’s lounge. Such lounges typically come with a small buffet spread, drinks, wifi and shower facilities.

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Jumping the queue – Surprisingly, there was still a queue likely because its a shared lane with JAL’s Premium Economy Class.

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We were given a Premium Lane pass as well as a Miracle Lounge pass. The former allows you to use a special lane for faster custom clearance. The latter offers passengers a chance to use the Miracle Lounge (I believe its a pay to use lounge) instead of JAL’s Sakura Lounge. The reason being that Sakura Lounge may be too packed. For us, we decided to risk it and try out the airline’s main lounge. Of course, I felt duty bound to ensure that you readers get a first hand experience of the Sakura Lounge from me.

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Sakura Lounge @  Suvarnabhumi Airport

Surprisingly, the expected crowd did not materialise. Maybe all the passengers decided to play safe and decided to hop over to the Miracle Lounge >< The lounge looks spacious and relatively new having been renovated recently. There are two main seating areas. One is more of a lounge setting. The other is more of a dining area with proper tables.

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The Japanese buffet spread was decent. While it adds a more authentic experience to flying a Japanese airline, I believe the lounge can offer a better and more varied selection of food. While there was a spread, most of the food was more like an appetizer and/or light. Don’t get me wrong. The food tasted fine but could have been more substantive and/or heavier (i.e. more meat and/or fish). Maybe some chicken katsu instead of small chunks of fried chicken? Or maybe some sushi?   

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The drinks on offer was okay. You have the usual soft drinks, milk, tea and coffee. For those who like to indulge themselves, the lounge offers cans of Asahi (and if I remember correctly Singha beer) and also different kinds of wine / spirits and also recommended sakes!

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While I was there, I also got a chance to use their shower facilities. Unlike the lounges I have been before, Sakura lounge offers a more private experience. Instead of shower cubicles in a shared washroom facility, the lounge has several private shower rooms. These rooms are cleaned and the towels / toiletries replaced after each use. Just approach the attendant outside for the key. Sorry no pictures as I forgot to bring my phone in =[

Business Class on JAL flight

For this flight, the seats are arranged into mini cabins separated by a panel. 

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Each mini cabin is spacious enough. This is with the separator screen down. However, I would have preferred a more open seat arrangement and less of a feeling that I am confined in a box. I can imagine the flight be less comfortable (psychologically since there is no difference in terms of the actual physical space) if the screen was actually raised.

The flight kit is pretty decent. You have your usual toothbrush, ear plugs, slippers and eye mask. There was also a “Moisture Mask” which is essentially a glorified face mask that help filter the dry air. The Sony earphones were pretty good as well.

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Once you are settled, the flight attendant will confirm your meal selection for the flight. For those wondering, this was the menu for my flight. Way different from what you see in Economy. No?

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Late night snacks and ordinary snacks

 

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Breakfast Menu

 

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Drinks Menu

 

For such late night flights, dinner is not served. Instead, breakfast is served just before you land. Business Class passengers can have a late night snack to help tide them through till breakfast. I had a plate of sushi and a “Sky-time Kiwi” for my late night supper while watching Pirates of the Caribbean ^_^ before falling asleep.

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Did I mention that the seats recline till they are flat? Really comfortable and as though you are sleeping on a bed! I am really considering splurging for my next trip to Europe and flying business and avoid having a stiff neck at the end of the flight.

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I went with the Japanese Breakfast. Of course, I had to try something unique to JAL right?

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View while having breakfast

 

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My verdict? Skip the Japanese Breakfast and just stick with the Western selection. Somehow, the Japanese Cuisine just doesn’t taste right with the reheating. The rice balls were disappointing. The reheating made them a tad bit too dry. The rice was also bland. The food was also so-so. Maybe Japanese food isn’t a flight suitable type of food (Did you know our taste buds taste things differently when we are way up high?).

Other than the average breakfast, I found the entire experience enjoyable as a whole. In fact, having flown the return flight back to Singapore, it appears that JAL’s Business Class is actually something that I would recommend and/or fly on again if I have the opportunity.

If you want to read more about my flight back from Tokyo to Singapore and/or the lounge in Haneda Airport, please remember to like and follow!!!

 

Fantastic 2017! Whats up 2018?

Fantastic 2017! Whats up 2018?

A happy new year to all my readers out there.

It has been a roller coaster year for me.

2017 saw me leaving the honourable profession of being a lawyer and going in-house as a legal counsel (which I still hope is an honourable profession). 2017 also saw me starting up my own spot in the world wide web with the creation of Etraveller Times. When I started this blog, I thought it would be merely a hobby of sorts where I get to share the many tips and tricks I picked up along the way. Well, that was how I saw it back then in August with me posting what I thought was cool travel hacks or tips that can make your travel a better one. I sought to answer questions like:

The blog then started to take a life of its own.

From a mere how to guide, it became my diary of sorts where I record the many experiences I had overseas and locally here in Singapore. Part diary and part guide to any willing reader wanting to know more. It started off as a simple introduction to Singapore’s attractions and must eat foods. That saw me making a special trip down to Singapore’s very own Botanical Gardens and the Chinese Gardens. It also saw me being a glutton taking in rich and exotic foods like Bone Marrow.

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Sup Tulang aka Bone Soup

Sup Tulang, Golden Mile Food Centre, Singapore

It then branched out to a mini-Taiwan guide (as a result of my constant business trips to Kaohsiung) where I discussed its night markets, its custom of betel nut chewing and my first in depth hotel review – 85 Sky Tower Hotel (again compliments of my generous employer).

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Then came my Bangkok series where I shared my 1-day itinerary historic/cultural itinerary and half day itinerary shopping/spa itinerary. Don’t worry, I have more installed for Bangkok ><.

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Jogjakarta was another awesome place to visit (especially for all those quitting from Drew & Napier’s Insolvency Team – Apparently it has become a pilgrimage for all of us quitters). Its more than just temples with an awesome hidden beach with a death defying gondola ride and also an exhilarating jeep ride to an active volcano:

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If that doesn’t sound like enough for a year, I also visited Malaysia’s Melaka (Malacca) and Johor Bahru before finishing the year in Hokkaido, Japan feasting on my many bowls of Kaisendons, drooling over fresh seafood all around me, looking at my girlfriend hugging a kick ass cabbage instead of me, soaking our feet in a natural hot spring river and seeing snow fall for the first time.

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What a wonderful year it has been for me! How has your year been?  

  

Review: Pocket Wifi Router (Changi Recommends)

Review: Pocket Wifi Router (Changi Recommends)

For those wondering how not to burn a hole in your wallet while remaining connected in Japan, I covered some great tips and alternatives in one of my earlier post. This is a follow up article where I share my experience using a Pocket Wifi Router that I got from Changi Recommends.

Collection of Pocket Wifi Router at Changi Airport Terminals

A really seamless process. Just order online and head over to the booth at the airport terminal. Place a deposit and you are done. Returning the device is likewise straightforward.

The kit comes in a pouch with the router (pre-charged) and a power charger. The power charger appears to have been set up for the region you are travelling to (i.e. with the correct socket plug type):

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Value for money

For those lost, these routers are small little gadgets that emit a wifi signal that your phone / laptop can tap into such that you have a mobile unlimited data wifi hotspot with you all the time. The data allowance for such routers are generally unlimited (subject maybe to a speed throttle in cases where the fair usage amount is consumed). While such routers are generally expensive (averaging USD100 for around 9 days of use), Changi Recommends offers a very reasonably priced router (unlimited data) at just SGD5 per day with the first day rental being free. This is a bargain at SGD40/USD30 for 9 days of unlimited data coverage!

Easy to use

Unlike other fanciful travel hacks (e.g. flexiroam – a sort of international data roaming service which I also use from time to time – check out my post here), there isn’t much fiddling to do to start using the router. It is as simple as turning it on and finding it on your phone’s/laptops wifi list and keying in the password that is located at the back of the router. Nothing complicated.

Fast connection

I don’t know whether you feel the same way but hotel wifi connections are terrible. Even for 5 star hotels, you sometimes have trouble getting a decent and fast connection.

The pocket wifi router solved all of that. The connection was fast and during my stay in Japan we used it for not only the most basic of things (emails/social media/google maps) but also the more data intensive applications like watching youtube videos and given the odd game or two of Mobile Legends (Side note: Japanese Mobile Legend players are insane ><)

The connection also held up away from Tokyo and worked spectacularly while we were in Hokkaido.

While the connection was generally good on the Shinkansen, there were certain times when the connection was weak. This is to be expected as the train was passing through tunnels with poor signal strength.

Battery Life

While there are other reviews claiming the battery life is awesome, my experience is that it actually depends on your use. Sure, if you just turn it off after each use, the router can definitely last for ages. But if you are like me and would prefer to feel like you are back at your home country (i.e. free access to data the whole day), you will likely keep the router on the whole day. Expect it to last approximately 8 hours before it goes flat (assuming two users). Less if there are more users tapping into the router. So be sure to have a power bank or two to juice up your device in the late afternoon.

I hope my review is helpful. If you are heading to Japan anytime soon, be sure to get one router for yourself.

As usual, please remember to like and follow! Each like goes a long way to help support this blog!!!

 

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